Posted 2 years ago
Posted 2 years ago
Posted 2 years ago
Posted 2 years ago

Virtual Space in the Library: Pottermore

Another way to extend the virtual space in your library is to invite students to share in exploring a virtual experience related to a book, or e-book. The one I plan to try with students is Pottermore. It is a website that “serves as the permanent home for the Harry Potter” series of books, and was developed by J.K. Rowling in partnership with Sony. The site allows fans to “engage in a unique interactive online experience that coincides with reading the books”. The site includes the author’s thoughts, and extra text that was not included in the novels, as well as additional content including background details and settings. The site also sells e-book and audiobook versions of the series.

As a Teacher-Librarian, I think this might be a way to get students re-interested in a great novel series, and reach a new crop of kids who were too young to read the books before, and also engage students who have seen the movies but have never read the books.

To learn more about Pottermore, go to the site and watch an engaging video of J.K. Rowling explaining the concept, and a “sneak peak” video showing inside the world of Pottermore.

Sources: Wikipedia: Pottermore, Pottermore website

Posted 2 years ago

Virtual Space in the Library: Good Reads

To extend the virtual space in your library, start a virtual book club with colleagues on Good Reads. Just create an account, complete a profile and adjust any security setting as you would for any social networking tool. You can create different bookshelves within your account, and add books you have read, and books you want to read. You can rate books and write book reviews. I have a virtual bookshelf for children’s books, and one for professional books; and a general bookshelf for everything else. You can also create reading challenges – I have challenged myself to read 20 books this year (not including kids’ books). You can access other readers’ lists and book ratings, as well as “friending” or following some great authors who are also on Good Reads. You can invite or ‘friend’ colleagues and see what everyone is reading. You can also create a group with your colleagues, which is private from your other followers not associated with that group.

 A link to my Good Reads account appears in the widget to the right of this tumblr blog, or click here.

Posted 2 years ago

These large wooden 3D puzzle Dinosaurs have been in our library for about 10-15 years. Many of the staff see them as a conversation piece, creating a big impression when visitors and students enter the library. With scheduled renovations to the flooring and fresh paint happening this summer, these dinos have been carefully labelled and packed away.

Share your opinion: Should the paleontologists conduct a dig and resurrect the dinos in our updated library space? Or should these relics stay buried?

Posted 2 years ago
What goes well with a good read? A nice cuppa. I love all kinds of teas, but my favourite is Chai Tea or Chai Latte. The best one I ever had was from my favourite Indian restaurant, Little India, on Queen West in Toronto. 
I asked them how they make it and was surprised by the simplicity. I have made it many times at home, but it is never the same as it is when they make it and I am surrounded by the sights and sounds of their lovely restaurant. 
Little India Chai tea: 
1 Tetley tea bag
1-2 inch chunk of fresh ginger, slightly crushed
1 bay leaf
4-5 cardamom seed pods
2 T. sweetened condensed milk, or to taste
Place the first 4 ingredients in a small tea pot, add boiling water. Let steep to desired tea strength, remove tea bag. Add condensed milk — sometimes I add a little 2% as well to make it creamier. The longer you let it sit with the spices, the more intense the flavours will be. When you can’t wait any longer, pour into a large mug. Grab a book, and enjoy! (makes 1 large mug)
“You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.”  
- C.S. Lewis

What goes well with a good read? A nice cuppa. I love all kinds of teas, but my favourite is Chai Tea or Chai Latte. The best one I ever had was from my favourite Indian restaurant, Little India, on Queen West in Toronto. 

I asked them how they make it and was surprised by the simplicity. I have made it many times at home, but it is never the same as it is when they make it and I am surrounded by the sights and sounds of their lovely restaurant. 

Little India Chai tea: 

1 Tetley tea bag

1-2 inch chunk of fresh ginger, slightly crushed

1 bay leaf

4-5 cardamom seed pods

2 T. sweetened condensed milk, or to taste

Place the first 4 ingredients in a small tea pot, add boiling water. Let steep to desired tea strength, remove tea bag. Add condensed milk — sometimes I add a little 2% as well to make it creamier. The longer you let it sit with the spices, the more intense the flavours will be. When you can’t wait any longer, pour into a large mug. Grab a book, and enjoy! (makes 1 large mug)

“You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.”  

- C.S. Lewis

Posted 2 years ago

Inspiration for creating a beautiful library space. 

Posted 2 years ago
Never trust anyone who has not brought a book with them.
Posted 2 years ago
Kritter Children’s chair from IKEA Sweden - $19.99
Sturdy and colourful - if you have the budget for it :)
http://www.ikea.com/ca/en/

Kritter Children’s chair from IKEA Sweden - $19.99

Sturdy and colourful - if you have the budget for it :)

http://www.ikea.com/ca/en/